March 6th, 2015, 13.00 hours



12 minutes extract from
B O D Y   S C U L P T O R S

 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Photo: Krisztián Fehér



Do you always put the empty yoghurt container
or the milk jug back into the fridge?
Do you like smelling people’s hair?
Can you draw circles with your pinkie toe?
Do you like writing without vowels?
Can you touch your nose with your tongue?
Are you as strange as everyone else?




Zero Ballet's new piece is about everyday otherness. It builds upon the sometimes funny, 
sometimes ridiculous, and sometimes pathetic oddities that make people unique - so different 
from each other and yet at the same time possessing similar qualities that make them
lovely human beings.




  Photo: Sam Matysen


The performance, among others, touches upon: 

· nature vs nurture: where do our characteristics come from? 
· are they inherited from our environment, our surroundings, or are they self-developed? 
· to what extent do they determine who we are? 
· is it in our power to choose or, perhaps even, to change them? 
· how are our characteristics are reflected in others? 

Body Sculptors is an autobiographical work 
where dancers act themselves during the performance.
In front of the audience a sculptor is creating an 
anthropomorphic clay figurine just as 
the dancers create themselves and each other. 



Choreography: 
Gyula Berger & Company 

Performers: 
Grégory Chevalier 
Anna Somlai 
Flóra Eszter Sarlós 
Boglárka Varga

Featuring: 
Malvina Antal, sculptor
Composer: 
Attila Szabó 

Costumes: 
Enikő Bodnár 

Light design: 
Balázs Szabon 

Director: 
Gyula Berger 


Supporters: 
Ministry of Human Resources, National Cultural Fund, L1 Association, Workshop Foundation 

Special thanks to: 
Linda Péter, Kata Szilágyi